Ride & Handling

The Fit is one of the sportier options in the segment. Throw it into a corner, and the Fit stays planted and level. It seems to ask to be thrown into the next corner even more aggressively. Conversely, the ride can be harsh over rough roads, producing jarring hits on potholes and highway expansion joints. I tried my best to avoid anything that would unsettle the car at highway speeds, which basically included anything larger than a quarter.

Also at highway speeds, the Fit felt uneasy in the high winds of a storm I drove through. It wandered back and forth on the road, thrown around by the wind.

Off the highway, the Fit handled suburbia and city driving well thanks to its maneuverability and how easy it is to park.

If you test-drive a Fit Sport and find its ride quality poor, be on the lookout for a non-Sport model, which may have a more forgiving ride. The base Fit gets 15-inch wheels and tires with taller sidewalls than the Sport's low-profile 16s. Downgrading to the base, however, means you lose cruise control and the electronic stability system.

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